Re-Visiting the Art of Chen Man: I-D Magazine, Pre-Spring 2012

i-D-Magazine-Covers-Chen-Man-6-600x799Fashion photographer Chen Man’s high-impact portraiture stands as a vivid symbol of 21st century China. A country once synonymous with austerity—and severity—during the Cultural Revolution has done a dramatic remapping of its place within the artistic milieu over the years, emerging as a world player in sophistication and taste. Man’s photography has been instrumental in defining exactly what that means, blending her country’s rich cultural heritage with contemporary life, constantly juxtaposing the two to create her own unique aesthetic, but one that remains distinctively Chinese. “Europeans watch Farewell My Concubine and come to China with all these romantic expectations,” Man told I-D magazine in 2014, “but when they arrive they’re met with skateboarders, break dancers, fashion photographers and a hip hop scene. I want to package this together and not only show it to China but show it to the world.”[i]idcover08

For the 2012 cover I-D Magazine‘s Whatever the Weather issueMan honored the “breadth of beauty in China today”[ii] with not one, but twelve different covers. Each cover is remarkably different—but equally stunning—in its depiction of China’s diverse cultural landscape (comprised of some 50 plus ethnic minority groups!). Only a handful of the models Man used were professionals, the rest she selected from the Tibetan High School. Each model poses with only one eye open, I-D Magazine’s signature, and yet for Man, the pose is particularly apt: one eye looking to the present, the future even, and yet one eye closed firmly on the past. After all, a country is nothing without its history—and China’s is incredibly vast. But Chen Man is most definitely a defining element of its future. idcover1210i-D-Magazine-Covers-Chen-Man-5-600x799i-D-Magazine-Covers-Chen-Man-4i-D-Magazine-Covers-Chen-Man-2-600x799i-D-Magazine-Covers-Chen-Man-3i-D-Magazine-Covers-Chen-Man-1i-D-Magazine-Covers-Chen-Man-8-600x799idcover13idcover09
[i] Quote featured in “Chen Man, the Chinese Princess of Fashion Photography,” I-D Magazine, January 30, 2014. https://i-d.vice.com/en_gb/article/chen-man.

[ii] Ibid.

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Golden Age of the Peacock: Fashion & Fantasy, 1894-1920, Part Three

The final part of a three part series in which The Art of Dress explores the influence of one of the world’s most beautiful birds, the peacock, and one of its “Golden” ages of influence on fashion from 1894-1920.

PART THREE: Peacock Personified

322px-'Ruth_St._Denis_in_the_Peacock_Dance'_by_Robert_Henri,_1919

The peacock’s association with romantic and exotic fantasy gave it new meaning after 1910 in the realm of costume design for stage and screen. As the print media expanded and the new art of film developed, actresses, singers, and dancers became idolized stars. Influenced by the overwhelming success of Sergei Diaghilev’s dazzling Ballet Russes, producers favored plays and films with exotic settings for eager audiences. Stars embodied the peacock in form and spirit, overcoming long-held theatrical superstitions that its feathers possessed the “evil-eye” and brought bad luck. The male bird became a symbol of exotic femininity and fantastical extravagance.

Photography by Jos Toloff of Ruth St. Denis posed for her role in Legend of the Peacock on the grounds of Ravinia Park, Chicago, Illinois, July 27th, 1914.

Photography by Jos Toloff of
Ruth St. Denis posed for her role in Legend of the Peacock on the grounds of Ravinia Park, Chicago, Illinois, July 27th, 1914.

Dubbed the “Soul of the East” by Vanity Fair, American dancer Ruth St. Denis (1879-1968) was known for her exotic costumes and choreography. St. Denis embodies the peacock in the premiere performance of Legend of the Peacock—choreographed by St. Denis with music by Edmond Roth. The dance, based on an Indian legend in which a woman’s excessive pride turns her into a peacock, would remain a staple of St. Denis’ performance repertoire well into the 1920s.

Photograph by Baron de Meyer of the model Dolores in a Ziegfeld Follies production of the Midnight Frolics, 1920, New York City. Reprinted courtesy of Condé Nast

Photograph by Baron de Meyer of the model Dolores in a Ziegfeld Follies production of the Midnight Frolics, 1920, New York City.
Reprinted courtesy of Condé Nast

Haute couture model turned Ziegfeld Follies showgirl, Dolores was admired for her beauty and statuesque frame, which she utilized to full effect in her stunning portrayal of the white peacock. In her book Allure, Diane Vreeland remembered the dynamism of Ziegfeld’s showgirls, especially Dolores: “I remember his girls so vividly. Dolores was the greatest of them—a totally Gothic English beauty. She was very highly paid just to walk across the stage—and the whole place would go to pieces.” The “White Peacock”costume was designed by couturière Lucile and still exists today in the collection of the Museum of the City of New York.

Gloria Swanson  as Leila Porter in Don’t Change your Husband 1919, Paramount Pictures, photo via Paramount Pictures.

Gloria Swanson as Leila Porter in Don’t Change your Husband, 1919, Paramount Pictures, photo via Paramount Pictures.

Gloria Swanson (1899-1983) brought fashion, fantasy, and peacocks to the silver screen in the Teens with three consecutive Paramount films directed by Cecil B. Demille, beginning in 1919 with Dont Change Your Husband, where she carried a peacock feather fan. In Male and Female that same year, she wore a spectacular peacock costume designed by Mitchelle Leisen. In her next film, Why Change Your Wife (1920), Swanson wore an evening gown decorated with peacock feathers. As one critic noted, “Three great pictures in which the wearer of the many-eyed plumes has leaped to fame—is it any wonder that Gloria Swanson says peacock feathers are lucky.”

Photograph by Karl Struss of Gloria Swanson as Lady Mary Lasenby in Male and Female, 1919, photo via Paramount Pictures.

Photograph by Karl Struss of Gloria Swanson as Lady Mary Lasenby in Male and Female, 1919, photo via Paramount Pictures.

Photograph by Karl Struss of Gloria Swanson as Lady Mary Lasenby in Male and Female, 1919, photo via Paramount Pictures.

Photograph by Karl Struss of Gloria Swanson as Lady Mary Lasenby
in Male and Female, 1919, photo via Paramount Pictures.

In Male and Female, Swanson’s character chooses death over marriage to a ruthless tyrant played by Thomas Meighan. Swanson remembered the unforgettable costume in her autobiography: “The greatest risk for me was the sheer weight of my costume. Two maids had to help me carry it when I was not on set. The gown was made entirely of pearls and white beads—enough to fill a bushel basket—and the towering headdress was made of white peacock feathers, which were a source of great consternation in the wardrobe department, for many people thought they brought bad luck.” A long-established superstition in theater and life, held that the “eyes’ of the peacock feather were long associated with the “evil eye” and the devil.

Louise Glaum in Sex 1920, photographer unknown, image via Selznick Pictures.

Louise Glaum in Sex
1920, photographer unknown, image via Selznick Pictures.

Actress Theda Bara in Cleopatra, 1917, image via Fox Studios

Actress Theda Bara in Cleopatra, 1917, image via Fox Studios